Category: Research

News about Research


Pain at the Dentist

From the June 2014 Desktop News | How can doctors make patients more comfortable during dental and other medical procedures? A University of Alabama alumnus recently received an award for exploring just such a topic. Dan McNeil, a New College alumnus who earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees from UA, and a current faculty member at West Virginia University, was named a Claude Worthington Benedum Distinguished Scholar, an award that recognizes excellence in research at WVU. McNeil examines the pain that […]

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Psychologist Receives $573,000 Grant

From the June 2014 Desktop News | A University of Alabama researcher is seeking to identify the factors creating growing disparities in mental health care across the country. Dr. Giyeon Kim, assistant professor in the Center for Mental Health and Aging and the Department of Psychology, has received a $573,000 career development grant from the National Institute on Aging/the National Institutes of Health to pinpoint the geographic factors contributing to racial and ethnic disparities in mental health care. The grant period runs […]

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From UA to Antarctica to the White House

From the 2014 Celebrating Excellence | Dr. Samantha Hansen spent Thanksgiving 2013 – and several weeks on either side of it – shoveling snow in Antarctica, and she’s likely to spend the next two Thanksgivings doing the same. But shoveling snow in more than 30-degrees-below freezing temperatures is the beginning of her labors. She now has more than 200 gigabytes of data that she will painstakingly anaylze over the next year to try to map a massive subsurface mountain range […]

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Cuba Initiative Enters Second Decade With Research in Medicine

From the 2014 Celebrating Excellence | Why do some third-world countries have lower infant mortality rates than developed countries? What can Cubans tell us about Ernest Hemingway? What are some similarities and differences between the emergence of urban agriculture in the U.S. South and Cuba? How do rivers transport bacteria? These are just some of the questions University of Alabama researchers have tackled – and are tackling – alongside Cuban researchers as the Alabama-Cuba Initiative enters its second decade. The […]

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New Book Recognized for Unconventional Approach

From the 2014 Celebrating Excellence | When Assistant Professor of Political Science Daniel Levine received his first copy of Recovering International Relations, a book he’d worked on for years, he couldn’t quite believe it. Merely having it in his hands – a book fueled by his former dream of working in Israeli politics and by his experiences living in Israel – satisfied him. And then the awards came. In June, Levine won the 2013 Sussex International Theory Prize, an award […]

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Students Win Goldwater, Hollings, Truman Scholarships

From the May 2014 Desktop News | Five College of Arts and Sciences students recently won prestigious national awards, helping UA to rank once again among the top universities with students selected. Of the eight UA students winning awards, two students from the College were named Goldwater Scholars, two were named Hollings Scholars, and one was named a Truman Scholar. Brian Goodell, a chemical engineering and physics major from Plattsburgh, N.Y., and Lynda Truong, a chemistry major from Grand Prairie, […]

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UA Researchers Earn National Cuban Award

From the May 2014 Desktop News | Dr. Vernon James Knight’s archaeological research in Cuba has earned him the National Prize from the Cuba Academy of Sciences, a major national award in that country. Knight, a professor in the Department of Anthropology and curator of southeastern archaeology at UA, received the award for research he conducted at the archaeological site of El Chorro de Maíta in eastern Cuba. The international collaborative research project lasted from 2006 to 2012 and involved […]

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NSF Grant Funds Study of Salt Trade

From the May 2014 Desktop News | What impact did the salt trade have on northwestern Louisiana during the 18th century? Paul Eubanks, a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology, is on a mission to find out. Eubanks recently received an $18,000 Dissertation Improvement Grant from the National Science Foundation to explore the topic. His project, “Caddo Salt Production in Northwestern Louisiana,” focuses on the role of Caddo Indian salt makers in the development of Louisiana’s history in the […]

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Anniston PCB Pollution Focus of New Book

From the April 2014 Desktop News | With Anniston as the backdrop, Dr. Ellen Spears, assistant professor in New College and the Department of American Studies, explores environmental justice in her new book, Baptized in PCBs, which was released April 7. Though focused on the 1990s legal battle between Anniston residents and the agrochemical company Monsanto, which dumped cancer-causing chemicals into the city’s working-class west side, Spears also addresses broader topics, such as significant themes in the social history of […]

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Traveling by Innate GPS-like Signals

From the April 2014 Desktop News | One of the most captivating mysteries in biology is the long-distance migrations of animals, particularly young animals that travel more than thousands of kilometers to specific, uncharted locations without older, more experienced migrants to guide them along the way. A College of Arts and Sciences alumnus is changing the way scientists understand one such phenomenon – the migration of Pacific salmon. Dr. Nathan Putman, a 2006 graduate of the Department of Biological Sciences […]

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